Making Justice Real

The Official Blog of the Legal Aid Society of the District of Columbia

Public Meeting on TANF

      So Others Might Eat and the D.C. Fiscal Policy Institute will be releasing a study on TANF in the District of Columbia next week.   They have planned an exciting event and public forum.   Their announcement for the forum is copied below.

Voices for Change: Perspectives on Strengthening Welfare-to-Work From DC TANF Recipients

Thursday, November 12

9:30 am – 11:00 am

12th Floor of Gewirz Student Center, Georgetown Law Center, 120 F Street NW

 16,000 DC families — including one of three children in the city — rely on Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) for cash assistance, job readiness training, and support services. A successful TANF program is critical to DC’s future. Yet too often, DC’s TANF families say they do not get the support they need to move from welfare to work. 

 Please join us to hear the key findings and recommendations from a new report by SOME, Inc. (So Others Might Eat) and the DC Fiscal Policy Institute about improving services for TANF families. The release will feature a short video of DC TANF recipients discussing their experiences with the program and a panel discussion including:

 Councilmember Tommy Wells (Ward 6), Chair of the Committee on Human Services

  • Clarence Carter, Director, DC Department of Human Services (invited)
  • Peter Edelman, Georgetown Law School
  • Donna Pavetti, national welfare expert at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities

 Please RSVP by November 9 to Tina Marshall at marshall@cbpp.org or 202-408-1080. Light refreshments will be served at 9:00 a.m. All are welcome – consumers, advocates, service providers, case workers, researchers, students.

 “People need to be dealt with case by case. And more services brought in and information that can help people with different issues…because it’s not just adults. We’re talking about children and families.”

– TANF Recipient

 This event is co-sponsored by the Georgetown Center on Poverty, Inequality and Public Policy.

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